Bramhope residents' fury over garden loss

Fencing along Leeds Road in Bramhope to outline the public right of way

Fencing along Leeds Road in Bramhope to outline the public right of way

First published in News

A controversial scheme to build four homes in Bramhope is being opposed by residents who claim it will take part of their gardens.

Neighbours on Wynmore Drive say they will lose between a metre to two metres from their gardens if the scheme goes ahead.

The planned development, on land beside Leeds Road, has already run into opposition from villagers who say the privately-owned site is a natural part of Jubilee Copse.

Now residents of Wynmore Drive are considering whether to appeal to the Land Registry after their garden boundaries were changed.

One resident, Catherine Liversedge, said: “The Land Registry resurveyed the land for some reason and instead of the land following the course of the stream they drew the line across the bottom of our gardens.”

She said nine properties had been affected by the change, but the householders were not informed.

“On close scrutiny of the plans it seems that the border between the applicant’s  land and that of the adjoining  houses, which was the stream, has been ‘straightened out’ and it seems that land will be taken from the end of the gardens of the adjoining houses to create an access road.”

She added: “If this goes ahead I and my neighbours will lose something between a metre to two metres from the end of our gardens and hedgerows, mature trees and fencing will be destroyed.  This will leave our gardens completely open to the rear, destroying both our privacy and security.”

Matthew Brooke, from Bramhope Assets, said: “There are a number of solutions to any alleged issue, but our view is that the HMLR plan we have worked to is correct. We undertook a substantial amount of due diligence on this point prior to submitting the planning application, and the plan we are working to was prepared by a surveyor from HM Land Registry following a measured site inspection in 2014, and plotted on a 2013 ordnance survey plan.”

Comments (1)

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5:36pm Fri 2 May 14

fbbramhope says...

The issue re boundary dispute remains that the land registry did indeed survey the land, however the red line was drawn incorrectly to the fence line and not the beck which is the line of ownership. Due diligence would have started with the deed of ownership that without doubt shows the beck as the boundary. To add to this as part of the documentation for the right of way hearing the current owner of the land states that their ownership is to the beck that 'has a bit of water in it'. All of this evidence is now with the land registry.
The issue re boundary dispute remains that the land registry did indeed survey the land, however the red line was drawn incorrectly to the fence line and not the beck which is the line of ownership. Due diligence would have started with the deed of ownership that without doubt shows the beck as the boundary. To add to this as part of the documentation for the right of way hearing the current owner of the land states that their ownership is to the beck that 'has a bit of water in it'. All of this evidence is now with the land registry. fbbramhope
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